All Courses

Aurisch on Art: Great Women Collectors

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Price: 20.00 USD
0 Weeks

07 - 13 - 2020, 01:00 PM - 02:15 PM 2020-07-13 01:00 PM - 02:15 PM

Dr. Helga Aurisch, curator at MFAH, will examine why and how great women assembled some of the greatest collections of all time—from Isabelle d’Este to Catherine the Great, Isabella Stuart Gardener and Peggy Guggenheim. Note: This will be a Live online webinar in which students will participate via Zoom at the designated day and time. Students will not be seen or heard but will be able to type questions to the professor during the session. Registrants will receive a link for participation.

Jill Carroll Explores Black Voices in America—"What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?" Frederick Douglass (Free Lecture)

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Price: 0.00 USD
0 Weeks

07 - 14 - 2020, 01:00 PM - 02:30 PM 2020-07-14 01:00 PM - 02:30 PM

Recent events have shown us that, despite whatever progress has been made, racism remains deeply woven into the fabric of the United States. In many ways, black (and brown) citizens live in and experience a very different America than white citizens. In these sessions, we will learn from two of the most important voices in American history on issues of race and white supremacy: Frederick Douglas and Martin Luther King, Jr. Both these pieces - a speech and a letter - are extraordinary examples of some of the best writing, speaking and thinking in American history. More specifically, they point us - especially those of us who are white - in the direction of understanding more clearly the racist structures that still undergird our society. As Maya Angelou says, "We do what we know; when we know better, we can do better." "What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?" by Frederick Douglas https://teachingamericanhistory.org/library/document/what-to-the-slave-is-the-fourth-of-july/ *This lecture is underwritten by Mary Lee and Jim Wallace **Note: This will be a Live online webinar in which students will participate via Zoom at the designated day and time. Students will not be seen or heard but will be able to type questions to the professor during the session. Registrants will receive a link for participation.

Travels with Barry: London Parks and Gardens

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Price: 20.00 USD
0 Weeks

07 - 14 - 2020, 05:00 PM - 06:30 PM 2020-07-14 05:00 PM - 06:30 PM

When one envisions London, the images that frequently come to mind are the River Thames, or buildings such as The Tower, The Houses of Parliament or Buckingham Palace; or perhaps the vibrancy of Piccadilly Circus, or the mayhem of shopping on Oxford Street. Seldom do we think of the city’s green spaces – yet, fully 40% of Greater London is open, public space – parks, gardens, squares – 3,000 individual areas covering an enormous 35,000 acres of land. Compare this to New York’s 19%, Houston’s 13%, and Paris' niggling 9%. This summary talk, perhaps a preview of a longer and more detailed series at a future time, will introduce you to a taste of this splendid inventory of Royal Parks, Country Houses, intimate Squares, and extensive common and heath land, remarkably surviving from the Middle Ages, and now providing unrivaled green amenities in the midst of one of the world’s largest and busiest urban centers. *Note: this class will be pre-recorded and students will have access to the lecture for one week. The link to watch the recording will be sent to students on Tuesday, July 14 by 5:00 PM.

Write Up (or down) the Summer

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Price: 175.00 USD
6 Weeks

07 - 14 - 2020, 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM 2020-07-14 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

For most of us, the summer of 2020 is about social distancing, cancelled vacation trips, virtual rather than physical presence at business and family occasions—and eating mostly at home. Not what we expected. But the disruption has cleared the path for more reading and also more writing. In this class, we will explore how recent and past reading influences our thinking and emotions as we toggle between confronting our worries and celebrating our blessings. Suggested themes will incorporate items from our 3 a.m. worry lists: racial conflicts, environmental threats, divisive politics, the economy. But also the joyous serendipities of unscheduled time. The stack of books on the nightstand and the thriller on the beach towel can enrich our writing as we note the writing tactics that build suspense and the vivid scenes that make a family from long ago and far away feel so familiar. Our zoom sessions will be preceded by writing prompts: excerpts from fiction, non-fiction and poetry that depict coping with the “down” realities within stories and excerpts that portray happiness and success. Prompts, however are not assignments. The online format of reading and discussing will adapt to your own new idea or current project.  *Note: A limited enrollment class. This will be a Live online meeting in which students will participate via Zoom at the designated day and time. A full experience, interactive class where students will be seen, heard, and able to ask questions of the professor as they so desire.

An Electoral College Education

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Price: 25.00 USD
0 Weeks

07 - 15 - 2020, 10:00 AM - 11:15 AM 2020-07-15 10:00 AM - 11:15 AM

This lecture will explain the origin and workings of the Electoral College and how it will shape both parties’ strategy in this year’s presidential election. The lecture will answer questions like: Are electors real people? Who choses them? Are they free to vote however they choose? And what are the prospects for ending or reforming the Electoral College? *Note: This will be a Live online webinar in which students will participate via Zoom at the designated day and time. Students will not be seen or heard but will be able to type questions to the professor during the session. Registrants will receive a link for participation.

More Great Short Stories: Modern and Contemporary

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Price: 175.00 USD
6 Weeks

07 - 15 - 2020, 01:30 PM - 03:30 PM 2020-07-15 01:30 PM - 03:30 PM

The best short stories leave you with a strong emotional response and a sense of awe at how quickly and masterfully a deft writer can create a world and connect you to its characters. What techniques help authors achieve these effects? And what, beyond word count, defines the unique, dynamic genre of the short story? How exactly does the length of a piece of writing connect to its expression as a work of art and our interpretation of it? In this course, we’ll consider “shortness” as a challenge authors undertake, investigating the ways they weave complex tales into brief, often pithy, masterpieces. We’ll read an array of short stories that unite the Victorian, modern, and contemporary moments, seeking to understand what unifies cultures across space and time. We’ll investigate the ways genre and culture converge to shape the stories we tell and the way we tell them. Featuring selections by Joyce Carol Oates, James Baldwin, Alice Walker, Carmen Maria Machado, Kurt Vonnegut, and J.D. Salinger, among others. *Note: Selections will be communicated to students prior to the class start date and will be new content. **A limited enrollment class. This will be a Live online meeting in which students will participate via Zoom at the designated day and time. A full experience, interactive class where students will be seen, heard, and able to ask questions of the professor as they so desire.

The Enigma of Thomas Jefferson

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Price: 25.00 USD
0 Weeks

07 - 16 - 2020, 10:00 AM - 11:15 AM 2020-07-16 10:00 AM - 11:15 AM

Jefferson’s range of interests and accomplishments are stunning, and he articulated the highest ideas of political and religious freedom. He was always an advocate of education. Scientist, architect, political philosopher, and much more, this multifaceted man often inspires us. But just as often he disappoints us. He was not a progressive in the realm of women’s rights, and, although a lifetime opponent of slavery, he never freed his own slaves or worked actively as president to advance abolition. How do we come to terms with this complex thinker? How is he to be understood? This course will examine Jefferson holistically and in the context of his age and place, and attempt to discover a Jefferson appropriate for our time. John B. Boles has just retired as the William P. Hobby Professor of History at Rice University. He edited the Journal of Southern History for three decades, directed more than sixty doctoral students, and won a variety of teaching awards. Among his books are a college textbook on southern history, a biography of Rice’s first president, Edgar Odell Lovett, and, most recently, a biography entitled Jefferson: Architect of American Liberty. *Note: This will be a Live online webinar in which students will participate via Zoom at the designated day and time. Students will not be seen or heard but will be able to type questions to the professor during the session. Registrants will receive a link for participation.

The Murray Report—A Midsummer Night's Dream: Woke America

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Price: 25.00 USD
0 Weeks

07 - 16 - 2020, 01:00 PM - 02:15 PM 2020-07-16 01:00 PM - 02:15 PM

In the midst of a pandemic and economic collapse not seen since the great Depression, a resurgence of racial conflict catapults the upcoming election into the history books. Don’t miss these individual and unique lectures with Richard Murray reporting on the current political climate. *Note: This will be a Live online webinar in which students will participate via Zoom at the designated day and time. Students will not be seen or heard but will be able to type questions to the professor during the session. Registrants will receive a link for participation.

Armchair Travel—Museums in Athens "Behind the Scenes": Ancient Greek Art from Cycladic to Classical

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Price: 25.00 USD
0 Weeks

07 - 20 - 2020, 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM 2020-07-20 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM

In this richly illustrated lecture Dr. Anna Tahinci will offer a virtual journey to her hometown of Athens, Greece and will be sharing her expertise in Archaeology and Art History. We will be virtually visiting a curated selection of Ancient Greek Art Museums: the Cycladic Art Museum, the Acropolis Museum, and the Archaeological Museum. *Note: This will be a Live online webinar in which students will participate via Zoom at the designated day and time. Students will not be seen or heard but will be able to type questions to the professor during the session. Registrants will receive a link for participation.

The 1960s and 2020: "What's Past is Prologue"

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Price: 25.00 USD
0 Weeks

07 - 20 - 2020, 01:00 PM - 02:30 PM 2020-07-20 01:00 PM - 02:30 PM

The phrase "What's past is prologue" was coined by William Shakespeare in act 2, scene 1 of "The Tempest". The phrase is engraved on the base of a remarkable sculpture titled “Future” housed in the National Archives Building in Washington, DC. And, the renown historian Arnold Toynbee utilized the phrase, as have many other historians and well known political figures. “What’s past is prologue” refers to the influence that historical knowledge has in creating a context for understanding and, perhaps, shaping the events of the present. In other words, the past is a preface to the present and future; we cannot understand our present moment if we have forgotten or never learned the lessons that history provides us. With that in mind, we will explore the protests of the 1960s in comparison to the ongoing 2020 protests to see if, in fact, the 1960s civil disobedience movements are far different from - or serve as prologue to – today’s massive dissent during our afternoon conversation. *Note: This will be a Live online webinar in which students will participate via Zoom at the designated day and time. Students will not be seen or heard but will be able to type questions to the professor during the session. Registrants will receive a link for participation.

How We Got the Alphabet

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Price: 25.00 USD
0 Weeks

07 - 21 - 2020, 01:00 PM - 02:15 PM 2020-07-21 01:00 PM - 02:15 PM

What is the alphabet, and how does it differ from other writing systems? What is the earliest evidence for the alphabet, and how did it spread from the ancient Near East to become one of humanity’s most adaptable and successful inventions? How did alphabetic writing transform the societies that adopted it? Using a number of inscriptions from the ancient world, we will consider the history of one of antiquity’s greatest contributions to the modern world. *Note: This will be a Live online webinar in which students will participate via Zoom at the designated day and time. Students will not be seen or heard but will be able to type questions to the professor during the session. Registrants will receive a link for participation.

Dominique Royem's Favorite Musical: "My Fair Lady" (Free Lecture)

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Price: 0.00 USD
0 Weeks

07 - 23 - 2020, 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM 2020-07-23 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM

Touted as the 'perfect musical,' "My Fair Lady" has been wildly popular since it’s debut on Broadway in 1956. It is a very good example of Musical Semiotics, or painting emotions in music, especially when you take a look at the genius orchestrations. During our talk, I will focus on the wonderful 1964 movie with Rex Harrison and Audrey Hepburn (with singing dubbed out by the inimitable Marni Nixon). Join me in a wonderful romp through the music of "My Fair Lady", as we take it apart and really look how the music gives life to the characters, with or without any spoken dialogue. *This lecture is underwritten by Jane Smith **Note: This will be a Live online webinar in which students will participate via Zoom at the designated day and time. Students will not be seen or heard but will be able to type questions to the professor during the session. Registrants will receive a link for participation.

Dublin: Welcome to My Home Town

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Price: 25.00 USD
0 Weeks

07 - 23 - 2020, 01:00 PM - 02:30 PM 2020-07-23 01:00 PM - 02:30 PM

Like New York, New York, Dublin is a city so good they named it twice: in the Irish language it is known as both Dubh Linn (the dark pool) and Baile Átha Cliath (the town of the ford of the hurdles). Join Robert Cremins—writer, lecturer, and native Dubliner—on a "power walk” through a millennium of history. On this virtual tour of Ireland’s capital, Cremins will point out artistic, architectural, and political highlights. And of course, there’ll be an Irish story or two along the way. We’ll explore the tensions and paradoxes that have made Dublin, in the words of poet Louis MacNeice, “Fort of the Dane, / Garrison of the Saxon, / Augustan capital / Of a Gaelic nation.” Robert Cremins, a writer and teacher from Ireland, has lived and worked in Houston for more than 25 years. He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, and in the graduate creative writing program at the University of East Anglia in the U.K. For the past ten years, he has lectured in the Honors College at the University of Houston. *Note: This will be a Live online webinar in which students will participate via Zoom at the designated day and time. Students will not be seen or heard but will be able to type questions to the professor during the session. Registrants will receive a link for participation.

Are the United States and China Headed for a New Cold War?

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Price: 25.00 USD
0 Weeks

07 - 27 - 2020, 01:00 PM - 02:15 PM 2020-07-27 01:00 PM - 02:15 PM

Tension between the United States and China is rising to a boil. While President Trump’s tariff war against China damaged bilateral relations, increasing rivalry between Beijing and Washington long predate his presidency. This rivalry reflects the growing power of China, its increasingly assertive foreign policy, and the challenges these developments pose to US primacy in world affairs. In recent months, the Covid-19 pandemic has intensified calls to decouple US strategic technologies and medical supplies from Chinese producers. Is conflict between the United States and China inevitable? How are other countries responding to intensifying US-Chinese rivalry? Joe Barnes – with forty years’ experience in the study and practice of foreign policy – will explore these and other questions in a special lecture. *Note: This will be a Live online webinar in which students will participate via Zoom at the designated day and time. Students will not be seen or heard but will be able to type questions to the professor during the session. Registrants will receive a link for participation.

Storytelling: The Best Human Connection

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Price: 60.00 USD
2 Weeks

07 - 27 - 2020, 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM 2020-07-27 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM

For centuries, storytelling has always been the most powerful mode of face-to-face communication. The overwhelming use of Zoom, Facetime, and Skype has added to the importance of telling a story as a method to connect, convey intimacy, and communicate an even greater level of humanism through technology. Storytelling is taking someone on a journey in the past and then returning him or her to the present. We may not remember a person—we do remember their story. We are taught how to write our stories but what about learning how to tell them? Each of us is born a blank page and leaves life as a full book. Our rich experiences are made up of meaningful episodes that fill those pages. This class will help students craft the story they want to tell. We will explore why humans are natural stoytellers, consider features required to craft a strong story, and examine ways to prepare and learn stories we wish to share. Through interactive exercises and learning to organize our rich experiences into a strong narrative, we can all become immortal through the best human connection—Storytelling. *Note: A limited enrollment class. This will be a Live online meeting in which students will participate via Zoom at the designated day and time. A full experience, interactive class where students will be seen, heard, and able to ask questions of the professor as they so desire.

Houston Lives and Legends: Business Leaders

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Price: 25.00 USD
0 Weeks

07 - 29 - 2020, 10:00 AM - 11:15 AM 2020-07-29 10:00 AM - 11:15 AM

From its early days as a port and trading center to its later ascendancy as a cotton, lumber, and oil market, Houston’s growth has been inexorably tied to its business interests. The business leaders who helped shape Houston also contributed to their fields both locally and nationally, and in some cases they even took on international importance. In this lecture, Jim Parsons of Preservation Houston explores the life stories and enduring impacts of six of Houston’s legendary business figures: lumber magnate John Henry Kirby; cotton broker Will Clayton; real estate developer Mellie Esperson; industrialists George and Herman Brown; and banker, publisher, and builder Jesse Jones. *Note: This will be a Live online webinar in which students will participate via Zoom at the designated day and time. Students will not be seen or heard but will be able to type questions to the professor during the session. Registrants will receive a link for participation.

Catherine the Great’s Love Affair with French Philosophers

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Price: 25.00 USD
0 Weeks

07 - 30 - 2020, 01:00 PM - 02:15 PM 2020-07-30 01:00 PM - 02:15 PM

In October 1773, after a grueling trek from Paris, the aged and ailing Denis Diderot stumbled from a carriage in wintery St. Petersburg. The century’s most subversive thinker, Diderot arrived as the guest of its most ambitious and admired ruler, Empress Catherine of Russia. What followed was unprecedented: more than forty private meetings, stretching over nearly four months, between these two extraordinary figures. Diderot had come from Paris in order to guide?or so he thought?the woman who had become the continent’s last great hope for an enlightened ruler. But as it soon became clear, Catherine had a very different understanding not just of her role but of his as well. Philosophers, she claimed, had the luxury of writing on unfeeling paper. Rulers had the task of writing on human skin, sensitive to the slightest touch. In this class, Zaretsky will explain why these meetings, held in Catherine's private chambers at the Hermitage, captured Europe's imagination, inviting us to reflect on the fraught relationship between politics and philosophy, and between a man of thought and a woman of action." Robert Zaretsky is a professor of history in the Honors College, University of Houston. Author of ten books—most recently Catherine & Diderot: The Empress, the Philosopher and the Fate of the Enlightenment—he is also a regular contributor to the New York Times, Washington Post, Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, Times Literary Supplement, and the Los Angeles Review of Books. His new book, The Subversive Simone Weil: A Life in Five Ideas, will be published next year. *Note: This will be a Live online webinar in which students will participate via Zoom at the designated day and time. Students will not be seen or heard but will be able to type questions to the professor during the session. Registrants will receive a link for participation.

Washington and Arnold: Character Matters

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Price: 25.00 USD
0 Weeks

07 - 30 - 2020, 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM 2020-07-30 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM

Many sports fans like to compare great athletes to determine who was the best? Was Mickey Mantle greater than Babe Ruth? Was Mohammed Ali greater than Joe Louis? Was Billie Jean King greater than Margaret Court? Was Nolan Ryan better that Sandy Koufax? How about Michael Jordan and Bill Russell? Similarly, many history buffs like to compare great leaders, including generals? During the American Revolution, who was the better general, Washington or Arnold? Who won the most battles? Who won the most important battles? Who was the bravest on the battlefield? Who was the most brilliant? Who was the better strategist? Tactician? What set them apart? And so on. Military historian and infantry officer John Bradley will review the careers of Arnold and Washington, evaluate their strengths and weaknesses as commanders, their successes and failures, and show how in the final sense, character matters. *Note: This will be a Live online webinar in which students will participate via Zoom at the designated day and time. Students will not be seen or heard but will be able to type questions to the professor during the session. Registrants will receive a link for participation.

Homebound Style: Fashion Tips for Zooming (Free Lecture)

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Price: 0.00 USD
0 Weeks

08 - 03 - 2020, 01:00 PM - 02:00 PM 2020-08-03 01:00 PM - 02:00 PM

Finding yourself at home more is no excuse to lose your style quotient. Learn the secrets of looking your best on your Zoom calls! You will learn styling tips for these all important meetings. We’ll cover makeup, accessorizing, and lighting to help you Zoom with flare! Ruth Chow-Kneese is a private clothing stylist. She focuses on organizing her clients’ closets as well as dressing them for their every day lives. The ability to pack for a trip with one piece of carry-on luggage is her specialty. *Note: This will be a Live online webinar in which students will participate via Zoom at the designated day and time. Students will not be seen or heard but will be able to type questions to the professor during the session. Registrants will receive a link for participation.

Travels with Barry: Lighthouses of the World—Beacons of Hope (Free Lecture)

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Price: 0.00 USD
0 Weeks

08 - 03 - 2020, 05:00 PM - 06:30 PM 2020-08-03 05:00 PM - 06:30 PM

Originating in ancient Egypt, lighthouses reached the peak of their usefulness in the 18th and 19th centuries, before modern technological developments marked their practical demise. Today, most of the almost 20,000 lighthouses that survive around the world, are viewed more as romantic, unmanned reminders of the past, though many still flash their familiar cadence to guide and warn of dangers still present in these far safer times. In this survey presentation of the subject, after a short historic introduction, we will focus on some of the most notable lighthouses of Europe and the United States, with particular emphasis on the buildings themselves; and we will also address briefly the developments in navigation and other technologies that led to the redundancy of lighthouses as useful coastal sentinels. *This lecture is underwritten by Cynthia & Stephen Brown **Note: this class will be pre-recorded and students will have access to the lecture for one week. The link to watch the recording will be sent to students on Monday, August 3 by 5:00 PM.

The Languages of the Bible

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Price: 25.00 USD
0 Weeks

08 - 04 - 2020, 01:00 PM - 02:15 PM 2020-08-04 01:00 PM - 02:15 PM

The land of the Bible is at the intersection of three continents, along millennia-old trade routes, and nestled between several international empires of antiquity. In this lecture, we’ll look at several biblical stories and inscriptions that provide evidence of the languages that were written or spoken in the world of the Bible, including stories in which translation, bilingualism, and linguistic misunderstandings play a role. I will also talk about some recent scholarship that has attempted to define the classical written language of the Bible in contrast to the dialects and vernaculars that were spoken in biblical times. *Note: This will be a Live online webinar in which students will participate via Zoom at the designated day and time. Students will not be seen or heard but will be able to type questions to the professor during the session. Registrants will receive a link for participation.

Inside the White House

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Price: 25.00 USD
0 Weeks

08 - 05 - 2020, 10:00 AM - 11:15 AM 2020-08-05 10:00 AM - 11:15 AM

Chase Untermeyer spent 4 1/2 years in the fabled West Wing of the White House during the administrations of Presidents Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush. He will describe how the White House works and how presidents seek to run the Executive Branch of the federal government through its staff. (It’s not like the TV series “The West Wing”.) The lecture will contain stories of White House life, both personal and historical. *Note: This will be a Live online webinar in which students will participate via Zoom at the designated day and time. Students will not be seen or heard but will be able to type questions to the professor during the session. Registrants will receive a link for participation.

Armchair Travel—Museums in Athens "Behind the Scenes": Modern and Contemporary Greek Art

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Price: 25.00 USD
0 Weeks

08 - 10 - 2020, 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM 2020-08-10 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM

In this richly illustrated lecture Dr. Anna Tahinci will offer a virtual journey to her hometown of Athens, Greece and will be sharing her expertise in Art History and Museum Studies. We will be virtually visiting a curated selection of Modern and Contemporary Greek Art Museums: the National Gallery of Athens, the National Glyptotheque in Goudi, and the Benaki Museum. *Note: This will be a Live online webinar in which students will participate via Zoom at the designated day and time. Students will not be seen or heard but will be able to type questions to the professor during the session. Registrants will receive a link for participation.

Trump, Biden and US Foreign Policy

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Price: 25.00 USD
0 Weeks

08 - 10 - 2020, 01:00 PM - 02:15 PM 2020-08-10 01:00 PM - 02:15 PM

The November election will provide voters with a clear choice on US foreign policy. While President Trump’s approach to foreign affairs is difficult to classify, it does exhibit clear themes. These include a strong protectionist bent, disdain for international organizations, a highly personalized style and a penchant for thinking of foreign policy in zero-sum terms. Former Vice President Biden, in contrast, is a conventional liberal internationalist likely to attempt a restoration of former President Obama’s approach to world affairs. Where do the two candidates differ on the key foreign policy issues confronting us, such as China’s rise, instability in the Middle East, and the role of international bodies like the World Health Organization? Join Joe Barnes – a US foreign policy expert at Rice University's Baker Institute – as he assesses the policy positions of Trump and Biden. Note: This will be a Live online webinar in which students will participate via Zoom at the designated day and time. Students will not be seen or heard but will be able to type questions to the professor during the session. Registrants will receive a link for participation.

Jill Carroll Explores Black Voices in America—MLK's "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" (Free Lecture)

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Price: 0.00 USD
0 Weeks

08 - 11 - 2020, 01:00 PM - 02:30 PM 2020-08-11 01:00 PM - 02:30 PM

Recent events have shown us that, despite whatever progress has been made, racism remains deeply woven into the fabric of the United States. In many ways, black (and brown) citizens live in and experience a very different America than white citizens. In these sessions, we will learn from two of the most important voices in American history on issues of race and white supremacy: Frederick Douglas and Martin Luther King, Jr. Both these pieces - a speech and a letter - are extraordinary examples of some of the best writing, speaking and thinking in American history. More specifically, they point us - especially those of us who are white - in the direction of understanding more clearly the racist structures that still undergird our society. As Maya Angelou says, "We do what we know; when we know better, we can do better." "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" by Martin Luther King http://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/documents/letter_birmingham_jail.pdf *This lecture is underwritten by Mary Lee and Jim Wallace **Note: This will be a Live online webinar in which students will participate via Zoom at the designated day and time. Students will not be seen or heard but will be able to type questions to the professor during the session. Registrants will receive a link for participation.

MacArthur

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Price: 25.00 USD
0 Weeks

08 - 13 - 2020, 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM 2020-08-13 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM

General of the Army Douglas MacArthur is the most controversial American general since Winfield Scott. Some people love him; others hate him. Brilliant, heroic, thin-skinned, egotistical, political, and long serving like Scott, he served on active duty from 1903 to 1950 and participated in World War I, World War II, and the Korean War. MacArthur conducted the most brilliant campaign in American history when he invaded Inchon and virtually destroyed the North Korean Army in days. John Bradley who first learned about the general during World War II in the Philippines, saw MacArthur close up and tried to meet the general in February 1945 in Manila, monitored his actions in Korea, saw his return to San Francisco after his dismissal, heard his speech to Congress in 1950, wrote about his campaigns in the Southwest Pacific, discussed MacArthur with biographer William Manchester, and has lived with his legend all his life, will review MacArthur’s career, highlight his campaigns, try to distill the essence of the man, and provide a perspective of a complex and fascinating man, the American Shogun. *Note: This will be a Live online webinar in which students will participate via Zoom at the designated day and time. Students will not be seen or heard but will be able to type questions to the professor during the session. Registrants will receive a link for participation.

The Murray Report—The Election is Coming!

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Price: 25.00 USD
0 Weeks

08 - 13 - 2020, 01:00 PM - 02:15 PM 2020-08-13 01:00 PM - 02:15 PM

The Democratic ticket is set. We expect the Republicans to re-nominate President Trump and Vice President Pence. Polls get more accurate. What’s going to happen? Don’t miss these individual and unique lectures with Richard Murray reporting on the current political climate. *Note: This will be a Live online webinar in which students will participate via Zoom at the designated day and time. Students will not be seen or heard but will be able to type questions to the professor during the session. Registrants will receive a link for participation.

Aurisch on Art: Puzzling Out Pictures

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Price: 20.00 USD
0 Weeks

08 - 17 - 2020, 01:00 PM - 02:15 PM 2020-08-17 01:00 PM - 02:15 PM

Dr. Helga Aurisch, curator at MFAH, will explore iconography, symbols and the hidden meanings that are revealed in various works of art. Note: This will be a Live online webinar in which students will participate via Zoom at the designated day and time. Students will not be seen or heard but will be able to type questions to the professor during the session. Registrants will receive a link for participation.

Misunderstanding the Bible

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Price: 25.00 USD
0 Weeks

08 - 18 - 2020, 01:00 PM - 02:30 PM 2020-08-18 01:00 PM - 02:30 PM

The Bible is the number one book that Americans like to pretend to have read. This lecture will be an overview of some common misconceptions about the Bible, from translation errors to thorny interpretive problems. Examples of misinterpretations we will touch on include the fruit of the Tree of Knowledge (hint: it's not an apple), the Ten Commandments (hint: it's not about "killing"), and the virgin birth (hint: it's not about sex). Rabbi David Segal is the Texas Lead Organizer for the Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism, headquartered in Washington, D.C. He helps congregations in Texas deepen their justice work and guides them into interfaith social justice coalitions. He is also a writer and teacher. Rabbi Segal was born and raised in Houston, TX where he attended St. John’s School. He is also a freelance writer for the Houston Chronicle’s Belief section. *Note: This will be a Live online webinar in which students will participate via Zoom at the designated day and time. Students will not be seen or heard but will be able to type questions to the professor during the session. Registrants will receive a link for participation.