Literature

THE GREAT JANE AUSTEN

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Price: 175.00 USD
6 Weeks

05 - 05 - 2016, 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM 2016-05-05 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM

The first version of Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey was written in the late 18th century in response to Ann Radcliffe’s Gothic novel The Mysteries of Udolpho (and published posthumously). She finished her last novel, Persuasion, in 1816. So, in effect, she moved the novel out of its early experiments and into the form that has persisted until today: a narrative of change and self-discovery, set in the inescapable social context of the family in all its complexity and the gender roles that also begin there for all of us. In the two hundred years since Persuasion, despite all the other changes we can hardly number, that kind of story not only still works, it makes good movies too.

THE TURN TO MODERNITY : ELIOT, TOLSTOY, JAMES

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Price: 250.00 USD
12 Weeks

09 - 08 - 2016, 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM 2016-09-08 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM

George Eliot’s Middlemarch was published in 1871-2, Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina in 1878, and James’s The Portrait of a Lady in 1881, and this wholly fortuitous order suggests how the socially responsible novel of the 19th century, which was the novel’s great age, turns inward and becomes the Modernist novel of the 20th century that is based in consciousness rather than in the family and its place in the social order. Eliot’s Dorothea Brooke is rewarded with a happy ending; Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina is punished for her waywardness; and what happens to James’s Isabel Archer is either one or the other. In good Modernist fashion, James cedes his authority and its moral burden to us, his readers.

A BOOK GROUP : Reading Critically Acclaimed Literary Works

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Price: 350.00 USD
8 Weeks

09 - 27 - 2016, 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM 2016-09-27 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM

This class will meet once a month, the fourth Tuesday of each month, except December, from September to May, to discuss eight literary works. The selections have been made from novels, collections of short stories, and memoirs that have received critical acclaim from peers, reviewers, and the reading public. Led by author and writing instructor Nancy Geyer, the course will differ from a lecture format in that class members will be encouraged to participate in the discussion of the monthly book assignment. It is patterned on the classic formula of book clubs that became popular in the early 20th century and continue to the present day. Emphasis will be placed on characterization, plot, structure, dialogue, style and atmosphere. The book selections and dates follow: (A limited enrollment class) • September 27 - The Wright Brothers by David McCullough • October 25 - Circling the Sun by Paula McLain • November 22 - The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah• • December - No meeting • January 24 - The Razpr’s Edge by W. Somerset Maugham • February 28 - Our Souls at Night by Kent Haruf • March 28 - The Lotus Eaters by Tajana Soli • April 25 - Operation Instructions: A Journal of my Son’s First Year and Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life by Anne Lamott • May 30 - The Marriage of Opposites by Alice Hoffman

Filmmakers as Poets : An Expression of Word and Image

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Price: 200.00 USD
8 Weeks

09 - 28 - 2016, 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM 2016-09-28 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM

“What is the use of a book without pictures or conversations?” So asks the precocious heroine of Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. Indeed, since the beginning of written communication, words and images appear as complementary facets of human expression. From logograms to illuminated manuscripts, ekphrastic poetry (poetry stimulated by a work of art) to comic books, pictures and conversations come together to create new ways of seeing and reading the world. Nineteenth century critics coined the elegant turn of phrase “Sister Arts” to emphasize the relationship between photographs, paintings, words, and music to show how various branches of art influence each other. Our class will discuss various examples of the Sister Arts in action from the 19th century to show how artistic movements flow across different media to enhance our viewing and reading experience. We will focus on poems and novels such as William Blake’s Songs of Innocence and of Experience, John Keats’s Isabella and the Pot of Basil, Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre, and Gustav Flaubert’s A Sentimental Education and their “sister arts” companions in Pre-Raphaelite paintings, Victorian magazine illustrations, operatic scores and contemporary film adaptations such as Jane Campion’s Bright Star (2009), Cary Fukunaga’s Jane Eyre (2011) and Jean-Pierre Jeunet’s Amelie (2001).

SHAKESPEARE : His Life and His Works

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Price: 175.00 USD
6 Weeks

10 - 20 - 2016, 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM 2016-10-20 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

As celebrations continue for the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare's death, the Shakespeare class for this fall will seek out connections between Shakespeare's life, his world, his plays and his poems. Through the research for her books Shakespeare's Friends and Shakespeare's Family, Kate Pogue has become an expert in Shakespeare's domestic life. The recent works of James Shapiro (A Year in the Life of William Shakespeare and The Year of Lear), Stanley Wells (The Shakespeare Circle) and Stephen Greenblatt (Will in the World) connect the events in his plays and poems to the life and culture around him. Exploring how Shakespeare's work relates to his life takes us to a deeper appreciation of his great genius

The American South in Literature

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Price: 175.00 USD
6 Weeks

10 - 20 - 2016, 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM 2016-10-20 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Southern belles, the French Quarter, fried chicken, the Confederacy, slavery – these are just a few iconic images/ideas that come to mind when people speak of “the South.” As both the former seat of slavery in the U.S. and a space conquered by the North, the South represents a space both and out of place within U.S. culture. But what exactly is “Southern” and what counts as part of “the South”? In this course, we will examine the narratives, tropes, and plotlines through which authors represent, discuss, and contest the U.S. South in American literature. Whether through the writings of William Faulkner or Carson McCullers, we will discover that, rather than a monolithic region, “the South” is actually made of many different, overlapping, and often conflicting concepts.

SHAKESPEARE - Time and the Seasons

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Price: 175.00 USD
6 Weeks

02 - 02 - 2017, 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM 2017-02-02 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

The passage of time is one of the great themes in the poetry and plays of William Shakespeare. This sensitivity to time finds expression in Shakespeare’s evoking the four seasons to set the scene in his plays and to reflect the emotions of his characters. When we explore King Lear abandoned on the heath, or the conjuring of the storm in The Tempest, or the witches appearing in the Scottish mists, we find Shakespeare inspired to his most original and evocative use of language. My favorite example is the beginning of Sonnet 73: That time of year thou mayst in me behold When yellow leaves, or none, or few do hang Upon those boughs which shake against the cold, Bare, ruined choirs where once the sweet birds sang. Join us to revel in more beautiful language as we spend six classes going through a year of seasonal changes illuminated by the imagination of William Shakespeare.

THE GREAT JANE AUSTEN

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Price: 175.00 USD
6 Weeks

02 - 02 - 2017, 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM 2017-02-02 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM

The first version of Jane Austen’s, Northanger Abbey was written in the late 18th century in response to Ann Radcliffe’s Gothic novel, The Mysteries of Udolpho (and published posthumously). She finished her last novel, Persuasion, in 1816. So, in effect, she moved the novel out of its early experiments and into the form that has persisted until today: a narrative of change and self-discovery, set in the inescapable social context of the family in all its complexity and the gender roles that also begin there for all of us. In the two hundred years since Persuasion, despite all the other changes we can hardly number, that kind of story not only still works, it makes good movies too. We will read her works in this order: Northanger Abbey, Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park, Emma, and Persuasion; and, we will have more fun with every page we turn.

THE ROARING TWENTIES - Part One

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Price: 175.00 USD
6 Weeks

02 - 02 - 2017, 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM 2017-02-02 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Jazz. Flappers. Speakeasies. Art Deco. The Harlem Renaissance. Widespread economic prosperity. The advent of the golden age of cinema. If we could time travel to any decade, we couldn’t do better than the 1920s. In the aftermath of World War I, the literature and culture of Europe and the U.S. erupted into frenzied expression. Historically, the success of women’s suffrage in 1919 and the flourishing of the Harlem Renaissance signaled new opportunities for women and African Americans. The 20s were about possibility, newness, change, and energy. Ironically, however, much of the literature to emerge from this time period reflects a different ethos. Iconic 20s novels like "The Great Gatsby", "Mrs. Dalloway", and "The Sun Also Rises" present war-torn characters and communities struggling with the loss of shared cultural values and the inability to locate moral and aesthetic meaning in traditional structures. In this class, we will investigate this 20s dialectic through the period’s novels, poetry, art, and history, questioning the relationships between the decade’s jubilancy, celebration, tumult, pessimism, and crash. Note: The material will be different in each class, so join us for one or both. We may even have to put on our dancing shoes as we watch demonstrations of the Charleston, the Peabody, and Turkey Trot. Part One: Celebration, Experimentation, and Art – F. Scott Fitzgerald; The Great War; T.S. Elliot; Masculinity and Expatriation; Ernest Hemingway; Women; Virginia Woolf; Literary Formal Experimentation; Gertrude Stein; Art; and André Breton

VICTORIAN FOODIES

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Price: 175.00 USD
6 Weeks

03 - 20 - 2017, 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM 2017-03-20 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Do you long for a time when everybody displayed proper dining etiquette? Do you have a fondness for afternoon teas with scones and clotted cream? Have you ever wondered whether people really ate boiled calf’s head? If so, you won’t want to miss this literary feast. In this course, we will consume lavishly arrayed meals through a selection of Victorian books that take food very, very seriously. We will read and discuss nineteenth-century meal plans, recipes, table settings, and, of course, etiquette guides from an array of sources to piece together what it was really like to eat during the Victorian era. Some of our readings will discuss the impact of the British Corn Laws and Irish Potato Famine on working-class meals, while others will demonstrate how English tastes expanded along with their territorial acquisitions. All will be delightfully delicious. Your taste buds will be titillated as we discuss Alice’s compulsion to drink and eat whatever she’s told in Lewis Caroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland; spicy delicacies from the British Empire in William Makepeace Thackeray’s Vanity Fair; Miss Havisham’s failed wedding feasts in Charles Dickens’ Great Expectations; the sensuous appetites in Christina Rossetti’s “Goblin Market”; as well as original recipes for soused mutton and plum pudding in Isabella Beeton’s Book of Household Management. (Note: I hope to satiate your desire to know which jam to serve alongside roast duck, though I can’t promise to solve the ever-vexing dilemma of whether to sit Aunt Mary next to the vicar or the duke.)

THE ROARING TWENTIES - Part Two

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Price: 175.00 USD
6 Weeks

03 - 23 - 2017, 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM 2017-03-23 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Jazz. Flappers. Speakeasies. Art Deco. The Harlem Renaissance. Widespread economic prosperity. The advent of the golden age of cinema. If we could time travel to any decade, we couldn’t do better than the 1920s. In the aftermath of World War I, the literature and culture of Europe and the U.S. erupted into frenzied expression. Historically, the success of women’s suffrage in 1919 and the flourishing of the Harlem Renaissance signaled new opportunities for women and African Americans. The 20s were about possibility, newness, change, and energy. Ironically, however, much of the literature to emerge from this time period reflects a different ethos. Iconic 20s novels like "The Great Gatsby", "Mrs. Dalloway", and "The Sun Also Rises" present war-torn characters and communities struggling with the loss of shared cultural values and the inability to locate moral and aesthetic meaning in traditional structures. In this class, we will investigate this 20s dialectic through the period’s novels, poetry, art, and history, questioning the relationships between the decade’s jubilancy, celebration, tumult, pessimism, and crash. Note: The material will be different in each class, so join us for one or both. We may have to put on our dancing shoes as we watch demonstrations of the Charleston, the Peabody, and Turkey Trot. Part Two: Renaissance, Humor, and The Great Depression - The Harlem Renaissance; Langston Hughes; Jazz; Ken Burns; Prohibition; Frederick Lewis Allen; Humor; The Crash; Anita Loos; Buster Keaton; The Great Depression; and Film

A BOOK THAT INFLUENCED MY LIFE: Presented by Four of our Favorite Professors

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Price: 175.00 USD
4 Weeks

05 - 08 - 2017, 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM 2017-05-08 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

All of us have read a book that changed us, made us think about the world differently, impacted who we were or who we were becoming—a book that would not leave us—a book that continues to influence our lives. In this exciting class, four of our favorite professors will give a single lecture and share “their” book with us. You will not want to miss these dynamic lectures—they could influence your life. Jill Carroll - May 8 Fernando Casas - May 15 Terrence Doody - May 22 David Brauer - June 5 Note: The class will skip May 29 for Memorial Day.

WHITMAN & DICKINSON

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Price: 150.00 USD
4 Weeks

05 - 09 - 2017, 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM 2017-05-09 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM

American literature would not be what it is today without the distinctive styles and influences of Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson, the first great American poets. Whitman and Dickinson figure in the US cultural memory in competing and often oversimplified ways: one as an enigmatic recluse who went unrecognized during her lifetime for her intimate examinations of the soul’s inner landscapes; the other as a lurid worshiper of the sensuous physical world and a gregarious champion of American democracy. Whitman’s amplitude and Dickinson’s compression make them an ideal pair for studying a full range of poetic possibility. Together we will read some of their most iconic poems, focusing on their respective attitudes about nature, death, friendship, sex, selfhood, and the soul. We will also learn about their publication and reception histories, and discuss their imprint on subsequent generations. For the last week of class, students will be invited to memorize one poem and to write one poem in response to our readings.

TIME TRAVEL NARRATIVES

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Price: 175.00 USD
6 Weeks

05 - 10 - 2017, 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM 2017-05-10 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Since H. G. Wells’ influential novella, "The Time Machine" (1895), Western culture has been obsessed with the possibilities of time travel—a creative and scientific venture that was further inspired by the popularization of Albert Einstein’s work on relativity in the early twentieth century. Since then, time travel narratives have developed into stories enthralled by paradox. These narratives delight in confronting the mind-boggling possibilities of logical impossibilities and the potentially disastrous consequences of temporal tourism. In this course, we will investigate a lineage of time travel narratives, from "The Time Machine" to Audrey Niffenegger’s "The Time Traveler’s Wife" (2003), focusing on novels and short stories. Nonfiction excerpts from Einstein’s "Relativity", Hawking’s "A Briefer History of Time", and J. Richard Gott’s "Time Travel in Einstein’s Universe" will also be read in order to gain a general understanding of the science of time.

SIX GREAT AND VERY DIFFERENT PLAYS

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Price: 175.00 USD
6 Weeks

05 - 18 - 2017, 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM 2017-05-18 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM

We begin with Aeschylus’s "Agamemnon", an early tragedy with few characters and much spectacle. In week two, we will examine Brecht’s "Mother Courage and Her Children", a war play which Brecht terms “epic theater.” Oscar Wilde’s comedy, "The Importance of Being Earnest" may be the funniest serious play ever written. It is used by Tom Stoppard as a basis of his "Travesties", in which James Joyce and Vladimir Lenin “debate” the relationship between art and politics. We will read both of these plays for the third class. August Wilson’s "Joe Turner’s Come and Gone" is what one critic calls “a ghost play” about the long legacy of slavery in America. Then, in the fifth week, we will follow Joe Turner with "Millennium Approaches" as well as the first part of Tony Kushner’s "Angels in America". If there is a modern play that can match "Agamemnon" in spectacle, "Angels in America" is it. The second part of "Perestroika" will be the final class.

CONTEMPORARY WOMEN'S FICTION

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Price: 175.00 USD
6 Weeks

09 - 06 - 2017, 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM 2017-09-06 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM

Women have been writing up a storm in the twenty-first century, sharing ideas, sufferings, and joys with their increasingly diverse audiences. Contemporary Women’s Fiction explores some of these current literary trends in women’s writing, seeking to identify shared threads of experience, style, and thematic approach in a diverse and interesting set of texts from the twenty-first century. What are some of the common stakes and interests in contemporary women’s authorship? How do differences in nationality, race, and religion shape women’s experiences? In this course, we will read novels (including one memoir) by American, Canadian, British, Nigerian, and Iranian female authors, plotting a map of women’s contemporary expression. Course texts, in order: • Ann Patchett, "Bel Canto" (2001) Extra Credit: United States vs. Hearst (trial transcript) • Zadie Smith, "White Teeth" (2000) • Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, "Half of a Yellow Sun" (2006) Extra Credit: Adichie’s TED Talk, “We Should All Be Feminists” • Azar Nafisi, "Reading Lolita in Tehran" (2013) • Margaret Atwood, "Hag-Seed" (2016) Extra Credit: Shakespeare, "The Tempest" • Louise Erdrich, "LaRose" (2016)

SHAKESPEARE: From Page to Stage

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Price: 175.00 USD
6 Weeks

09 - 07 - 2017, 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM 2017-09-07 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

This class will draw heavily from Kate’s collection of video tapes, especially those made by the BBC in the 1980’s called "Playing Shakespeare". Hosted by John Barton, these tapes are a series of master classes showing John working with great actors on how to bring the Shakespeare texts to life. The actors include Patrick Stewart, David Suchet (of Poirot fame), Peggy Ashcroft, Ian McKellen, and other great 20th century British actors. Films of Shakespearean plays will illuminate the vocal and acting techniques illustrated in the master classes: Olivier’s "Henry V", "Richard III", "Othello", "King Lear" and "Merchant of Venice"; Branagh’s "Henry V", "Much Ado About Nothing", "Hamlet", and "Love’s Labour’s Lost"; McKellen’s "Richard III", Derek Jacobi’s "Richard II" all will be seen as examples of the art of Shakespearean acting. Students are encouraged to buy a copy of John Barton’s "Playing Shakespeare", the book which accompanies the video tapes.

THE NOVEL MOVES TO MODERNITY

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Price: 250.00 USD
12 Weeks

09 - 07 - 2017, 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM 2017-09-07 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM

George Eliot’s "Middlemarch", Tolstoy’s "Anna Karenina", and Henry James’s "The Portrait of a Lady" all have historically appropriate heroines but very different narrative styles. Eliot often seems to write from a pulpit, issuing judgments commensurate with our sense of Victorian morality. Tolstoy’s alternation of relatively short chapters and his belief that our behavior is more physiological than international gives his narrative the difficult feeling that cause and effect are sometimes hardly related, which makes morality problematic. James is as impersonal as a nineteenth-century narrator can be. His characters sometimes seem opaque within their own consciousness and we are left on our own to make any final judgments. James’s ending is quite open; Eliot’s is firmly closed; and Tolstoy’s are both. And this tells the story of the nineteenth century novel’s turn to modernism. All three novels come in Penguin editions. We will start with Eliot.

WOMEN IN THE AMERICAN WEST

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Price: 175.00 USD
6 Weeks

09 - 08 - 2017, 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM 2017-09-08 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

When we think of the American West, we tend to envision tough, independent, standoffish men, such as sheriffs and outlaws, cowboys and ranchers, roaming across wild desert and mountain landscapes on horseback. Where do women reside in our collective imagination of such a West? Usually, they are being rescued by these men or are assigned the task of taming these frontier landscapes from within the built space of the home. In this class, we will be examining the hardships, hopes, and homes of the “American West” through the eyes, voices, and memories of women. To this end, we will study one film, memoirs, biographical fiction, and poetry—for how they create and complicate our ideas of the nineteenth-century and present-day West. Women in the West have always been a formidable force for personal and social change. Texts include Helena Maria Viramontes’s Under the Feet of Jesus (1995), Sandra Day O’Connor’s Lazy B (2002), Leslie Marmon Silko’s The Turquoise Ledge (2010), Liz Stephens’s The Days Are Gods (2013), and The Homesman (2014), a film starring Hilary Swank and directed by Tommy Lee Jones.

A BOOK GROUP: Reading Critically Acclaimed Literary Works

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Price: 350.00 USD
0 Weeks

09 - 26 - 2017, 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM 2017-09-26 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM

This class will meet once a month to discuss eight literary works. We will meet the fourth Tuesday of each month, from September to May, excluding December. The selections have been made from novels, collections of short stories, and memoirs that have received critical acclaim from peers, reviewers, and the reading public. Led by author and writing instructor Nancy Geyer, the course will differ from a lecture format in that class members will be encouraged to participate in the discussion of the monthly book assignment. It is patterned on the classic formula of book clubs that became popular in the early 20th century and continue to the present day. Emphasis will be placed on characterization, plot, structure, dialogue, style, and atmosphere. The book selections and dates follow: (A limited enrollment class) • September 26 "A Gentleman in Moscow" - Amor Towles • October 24 "News of the World" - Paulette Jiles • November 28 "The Underground Railroad" - Colson Whitehead • December No Meeting • January 23 "The House of the Spirits" – Isabelle Allende • February 27 "Nutshell" – Ian McEwan • March 27 "The Old Man and the Sea" and "A Moveable Feast" Earnest Hemigway • April 24 "My Mother’s Keeper: A Daughter’s Memoir of Growing Up in the Shadow of Schizophrenia" – Tara Elgin Holley with Joe Holley • May 22 "The Day the World Came to Town" – Jim Defede

A BOOK GROUP: Reading Critically Acclaimed Literary Works

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Price: 300.00 USD
0 Weeks

01 - 23 - 2018, 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM 2018-01-23 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM

This class will meet once a month to discuss e literary works. We will meet the fourth Tuesday of each month, from September to May, excluding December. The selections have been made from novels, collections of short stories, and memoirs that have received critical acclaim from peers, reviewers, and the reading public. Led by author and writing instructor Nancy Geyer, the course will differ from a lecture format in that class members will be encouraged to participate in the discussion of the monthly book assignment. It is patterned on the classic formula of book clubs that became popular in the early 20th century and continue to the present day. Emphasis will be placed on characterization, plot, structure, dialogue, style, and atmosphere. The book selections and dates follow: • January 23 The House of the Spirits – Isabelle Allende • February 27 Nutshell – Ian McEwan • March 27 The Old Man and the Sea and A Moveable Feast Earnest Hemigway • April 24 My Mother’s Keeper: A Daughter’s Memoir of Growing Up in the Shadow of Schizophrenia – Tara Elgin Holley with Joe Holley • May 22 The Day the World Came to Town – Jim Defede

HOW THE NOVEL WORKS

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Price: 250.00 USD
12 Weeks

02 - 08 - 2018, 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM 2018-02-08 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM

Is the most important thing about the novel the narrator’s relation to the author, the plot’s beginning and end, or the importance of its moral themes? It is actually the narrator’s relation to the protagonist, then that protagonist’s relationships to the other characters in the system of their complementary and contending points of view, which therefore makes the middle part of the novel the most important part of the “plot.” So, to explore these and other formal issues, we will read a variety of classical modernist novels, most of them short, which play against each other and offer a variety of answers to these questions. The novel is a most capacious genre, including both Pride and Prejudice and Ulysses, and makes up its own rules as it goes along. • Introduction to Terms, Definitions, and Lionel Trilling • Chandler: The Big Sleep (Vintage) • Conrad: The Heart of Darkness (Penguin) • Dostoevsky: Notes from Underground (Modern Library) • Kertesz: Fateless (Northwestern) • Woolf: To the Lighthouse (Harcourt Brace) • Faulkner: As I Lay Dying (Vintage) • Jones: The Known World (Amistad) • O’Brien: The Things They Carried (Houghton Mifflin) • Roth: The Ghost Writer (Vintage) • Pushkin: Eugene Onegin (Penguin

MASTERWORKS OF ROMANTICISM

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Price: 175.00 USD
6 Weeks

04 - 03 - 2018, 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM 2018-04-03 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM

Romanticism was a period (ca. 1750s-1850s) marked by revolutions: the American Revolution, French Revolution, Industrial Revolution, and the dozen or more revolutions of 1848. While the vast majority of Romantic writers weren’t directly involved in any armed conflicts, they contributed to the revolutionary spirit of their day through their poetry and prose—which we now know was revolutionary in its own right. Romantic writers gave voice to a new set of values and beliefs that not only challenged the prevailing social norms, but also unmasked broad social anxieties about the place of the individual in society, the rise of industry, and the degradation of the natural world. In this course, we will read seven masterworks of British and American Romanticism by seven representative authors in these traditions. Ranging from poetry and songs to novels and essays, the selected texts will provide a sense of the breadth and depth of Romanticism in both its British and American forms. We will devote the first three weeks to our British Romantic authors and the last three weeks to our American Romantics. We will seek both to understand these individual texts in terms of their content, form, and historical context, as well as think about the nature of cultural movements like Romanticism more broadly. The authors and texts covered in this course include: • William Blake, Songs of Innocence and of Experience (1794) • William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Lyrical Ballads (1798) • Mary Shelley, Frankenstein (1818) • Ralph Waldo Emerson, “Nature” (1836) and “Self-Reliance” (1841) • Henry David Thoreau, Walden (1854) • Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass (1855)

THE BEST OF THE SHAKESPEARE COMEDIES

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Price: 175.00 USD
6 Weeks

04 - 17 - 2018, 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM 2018-04-17 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

In the past few decades a number of Shakespearean comedies have been made into entrancing films. Like the original plays, these presentations are a treat for popular and esoteric audiences alike. Kate Pogue has chosen six of her favorite comedies to watch in their entirety: Love’s Labour’s Lost, Taming of the Shrew, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Much Ado about Nothing, As You Like It, and Twelfth Night, making this course a joyful, mini Shakespeare Festival. The films have been directed by the best of the best—Franco Zefferelli, Trevor Nunn, and Kenneth Branagh. If this summer is not the right one for you to travel to Stratford or London, or if you’ve always wondered why people love Shakespeare and would like to find out, come and be transported and amused as we enjoy the best of the Shakespeare comedies. (*The extra 30 minutes is for viewing the films. A limited enrollment class)

ROMANCING THE 20TH CENTURY

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Price: 175.00 USD
6 Weeks

05 - 01 - 2018, 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM 2018-05-01 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

How does the twentieth century treat love and passion on the page? Truth be told, the past century is known for its rebellion against traditional emotional expression, which modernist and postmodernist writers replaced with abstractions, distancing themselves from the more tender connections between people. Despite this aversion to feeling, however, authors were writing romantic texts, although of a different texture than the likes of, say, Jane Austen. What are the defining characteristics of the twentieth-century romance? How do authors express sexual desire, abiding love, romantic jealousy, and romantic sorrow? We’ll begin with short stories by Faulkner and Raymond Carver, then read selections by D. H. Lawrence, Daphne du Maurier, Jean Rhys, and Michael Ondaatje. For the final session, the class will vote on whether to read and discuss Nicolas Sparks’ The Notebook or Diana Gabaldon’s Outlander. Either way, we’ll have a viewing party at the end of the six weeks to watch one of these films/episodes, eat popcorn, and discuss the translation of romantic text to romantic film. Week 1 • “A Rose for Emily,” William Faulkner (1920) • “What We Talk about When We Talk about Love,” Raymond Carver (1981) Week 2 • Lady Chatterley’s Lover and “The Fox,” D. H. Lawrence (1928 and 1922) Week 3 • Rebecca, Daphne du Maurier (1938) Week 4 • Wide Sargasso Sea, Jean Rhys (1966) Week 5 • The English Patient, Michael Ondaatje (1992) Week 6: Student Choice • The Notebook, Nicolas Sparks (1996) OR • Outlander, Diana Gabaldon (1991)

ROMANCING THE 20TH CENTURY

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Price: 175.00 USD
6 Weeks

05 - 01 - 2018, 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM 2018-05-01 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

How does the twentieth century treat love and passion on the page? What are the defining characteristics of the twentieth-century romance? How do authors express sexual desire, abiding love, romantic jealousy, and romantic sorrow? Even though the past century is known for its rebellion against traditional emotional expression, we will examine the following selections and end with a viewing party (with popcorn) to discuss the translation of romantic text into film: *Week 1: “A Rose for Emily,” William Faulkner and “What We Talk about When We Talk about Love,” Raymond Carver *Week 2: Lady Chatterley’s Lover and “The Fox,” D. H. Lawrence *Week 3: Rebecca, Daphne du Maurier *Week 4: Wide Sargasso Sea, Jean Rhys *Week 5: The English Patient, Michael Ondaatje *Week 6: Student Choice: The Notebook, Nicolas Sparks OR Outlander, Diana Gabaldon

LEAVES OF GRASS AND MOBY-DICK

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Price: 175.00 USD
6 Weeks

05 - 03 - 2018, 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM 2018-05-03 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM

Whitman is our greatest poet and Melville’s Moby-Dick, perhaps, our greatest novel. Moby-Dick was published in 1851. Whitman published the first of nine editions of Leaves of Grass is 1855. Both are “epic” works and, in many ways, completely eccentric; and together they establish American literature’s independence of the British traditions that dominated American culture. We will spend four weeks on Moby-Dick, two weeks on Leaves of Grass; and in the first class, we will cover Chapters 1-23 (The Lee Shore) of Moby –Dick. This isn’t a book to read at the beach!

ENGLISH 101: An Introduction to Literature

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Price: 250.00 USD
12 Weeks

09 - 06 - 2018, 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM 2018-09-06 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM

This course will remind you of the introductory English courses taught in days of yore. We will read novels, poems, and plays in order to ask ourselves what are the essential differences between them. • Henrik Ibsen, "Hedda Gabler" • Henrik Ibsen, "Ghosts" and a "Doll House" • Anton Chekhov, "Uncle Vanya" and "Three Sisters" • J.M. Coetzee, "Life and Times of Michael K" • Nadine Gordimer, "July’s People" • Alice Munro, "Dear Life" • Edward P. Jones, "All Aunt Hagar’s Children" • Tom Stoppard, "India Ink" • Tom Stoppard, "Arcadia" • Philip Larkin, "Collected Poems" • Robert Has, "Apple Trees at Olema" • Leftover Poems!

THE DIRTY THIRTIES: Literature and Culture of the Great Depression

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Price: 225.00 USD
10 Weeks

09 - 10 - 2018, 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM 2018-09-10 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM

In 1929, the U.S. stock market experienced the most devastating crash in its history, beginning a long depression that would continue until the American entry into World War II in 1941. In contrast to the “roaring” jubilancy and widespread economic prosperity of the 1920s, the 1930s was a decade of poverty and struggle. American culture, however, flourished both because and in spite of the Great Depression. Art began to take more inspiration from the average, struggling American, ushering in an age of Social Realism that infused art with political statement. Led by F.D.R., the government supported writers and visual artists. Big band swing took over from hot jazz, and dancing styles increased in athleticism. “Talkies” became the norm, and 1939 is still considered one of the greatest years in film due to the releases of The Wizard of Oz and Gone with the Wind. In this course, we’ll study the history, literature, music, art, and film of the vibrant but complex 1930s with an eye for how this decade helped define contemporary American culture.

A BOOK GROUP: Reading Critically Acclaimed Literary Works

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Price: 350.00 USD
8 Weeks

09 - 25 - 2018, 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM 2018-09-25 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM

This class will meet once a month to discuss eight literary works. We will meet the fourth Tuesday of each month, from September to May, excluding December. The selections have been made from novels, collections of short stories, and memoirs that have received critical acclaim from peers, reviewers, and the reading public. Led by author and writing instructor Nancy Geyer, the course will differ from a lecture format in that class members will be encouraged to participate in the discussion of the monthly book assignment. It is patterned on the classic formula of book clubs that became popular in the early 20th century and continue to the present day. Emphasis will be placed on characterization, plot, structure, dialogue, style, and atmosphere. The book selections and dates follow: (A limited enrollment class) • September 25 "Leonardo Da Vinci" – Walter Isaacson • October 23 "A Man Called Ove" – Fredrick Backman • November 27 "Little Bee" – Chris Cleeve • December No Meeting • January 22 "West with the Night" – Beryl Markham • February 26 "Hillbilly Elegy" – J.D. Vance • March 26 "My Name is Lucy Barton" – Elizabeth Strout • April 23 "One Day" – David Nicholls • May 28 "Blue Highways" – Heat Moon