Sunday Lectures

PICASSO - The Line

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Price: 35.00 USD
0 Weeks

09 - 25 - 2016, 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM 2016-09-25 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

In conjunction with the exhibition Picasso: The Line, on view at the Menil Collection until January 8 2017, Dr. Anna Tahinci will relate the fascinating story of Pablo Picasso, the most prolific and influential artist of the first half of the 20th century, and she will take us on a journey behind the scenes of the Picasso exhibition featuring 70 line drawings from public and private collections in the United States and Europe, including the Menil Collection, the Musée Picasso in Paris, the Museum of Modern Art in New York, as well as Paloma Picasso's private collection.

PICASSO - The Line

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Price: 35.00 USD
1 Weeks

09 - 25 - 2016, 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM 2016-09-25 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

In conjunction with the exhibition Picasso: The Line, on view at the Menil Collection until January 8 2017, Dr. Anna Tahinci will relate the fascinating story of Pablo Picasso, the most prolific and influential artist of the first half of the 20th century, and she will take us on a journey behind the scenes of the Picasso exhibition featuring 70 line drawings from public and private collections in the United States and Europe, including the Menil Collection, the Musée Picasso in Paris, the Museum of Modern Art in New York, as well as Paloma Picasso's private collection.

DEGAS - A New Vision (Both)

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Price: 60.00 USD
2 Weeks

10 - 23 - 2016, 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM 2016-10-23 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

On exhibit from October 14 to January 9, the MFAH is the ONLY venue in the U.S. for this overview by the great Impressionist painter Edgar Degas. Given his popularity, it is surprising that this is the first major retrospective in 30 years—and different from the current exhibit “Edgar Degas: A Strange New Beauty” at MOMA in New York ending in July. In recent years a perception of Degas as only a painter of the ballet and the race track has deepened and become more complex. His principal vision was to create a new post classical view of the human body, primarily of women at work in the modern world—even the ballet dancers are more often than not shown in the arduous work of practice and rehearsals. In this two-session presentation, we will show a wider and more diverse view of the works of Degas, extensively slide-illustrated with both familiar and less familiar works.

DEGAS - A New Vision (Both)

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Price: 60.00 USD
2 Weeks

10 - 23 - 2016, 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM 2016-10-23 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

On exhibit from October 14 to January 9, the MFAH is the ONLY venue in the U.S. for this overview by the great Impressionist painter Edgar Degas. Given his popularity, it is surprising that this is the first major retrospective in 30 years—and different from the current exhibit “Edgar Degas: A Strange New Beauty” at MOMA in New York ending in July. In recent years a perception of Degas as only a painter of the ballet and the race track has deepened and become more complex. His principal vision was to create a new post classical view of the human body, primarily of women at work in the modern world—even the ballet dancers are more often than not shown in the arduous work of practice and rehearsals. In this two-session presentation, we will show a wider and more diverse view of the works of Degas, extensively slide-illustrated with both familiar and less familiar works.

DEGAS - A New Vision (Part1)

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Price: 35.00 USD
0 Weeks

10 - 23 - 2016, 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM 2016-10-23 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

On exhibit from October 14 to January 9, the MFAH is the ONLY venue in the U.S. for this overview by the great Impressionist painter Edgar Degas. Given his popularity, it is surprising that this is the first major retrospective in 30 years—and different from the current exhibit “Edgar Degas: A Strange New Beauty” at MOMA in New York ending in July. In recent years a perception of Degas as only a painter of the ballet and the race track has deepened and become more complex. His principal vision was to create a new post classical view of the human body, primarily of women at work in the modern world—even the ballet dancers are more often than not shown in the arduous work of practice and rehearsals. In this two-session presentation, we will show a wider and more diverse view of the works of Degas, extensively slide-illustrated with both familiar and less familiar works.

DEGAS - A New Vision (Part2)

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Price: 35.00 USD
1 Weeks

10 - 30 - 2016, 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM 2016-10-30 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

On exhibit from October 14 to January 9, the MFAH is the ONLY venue in the U.S. for this overview by the great Impressionist painter Edgar Degas. Given his popularity, it is surprising that this is the first major retrospective in 30 years—and different from the current exhibit “Edgar Degas: A Strange New Beauty” at MOMA in New York ending in July. In recent years a perception of Degas as only a painter of the ballet and the race track has deepened and become more complex. His principal vision was to create a new post classical view of the human body, primarily of women at work in the modern world—even the ballet dancers are more often than not shown in the arduous work of practice and rehearsals. In this two-session presentation, we will show a wider and more diverse view of the works of Degas, extensively slide-illustrated with both familiar and less familiar works.

DEGAS - A New Vision (Part2)

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Price: 35.00 USD
0 Weeks

10 - 30 - 2016, 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM 2016-10-30 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

On exhibit from October 14 to January 9, the MFAH is the ONLY venue in the U.S. for this overview by the great Impressionist painter Edgar Degas. Given his popularity, it is surprising that this is the first major retrospective in 30 years—and different from the current exhibit “Edgar Degas: A Strange New Beauty” at MOMA in New York ending in July. In recent years a perception of Degas as only a painter of the ballet and the race track has deepened and become more complex. His principal vision was to create a new post classical view of the human body, primarily of women at work in the modern world—even the ballet dancers are more often than not shown in the arduous work of practice and rehearsals. In this two-session presentation, we will show a wider and more diverse view of the works of Degas, extensively slide-illustrated with both familiar and less familiar works.

CARCASSONNE AND THE CATHAR CASTLES

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Price: 35.00 USD
0 Weeks

11 - 06 - 2016, 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM 2016-11-06 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

Girded by a double ring of walls with 52 towers, Carcassonne is the finest surviving example of a medieval fortified town. Built first by Romans, then Visigoths, the fortifications were extended by the construction of the outer wall under King Louis IX and his successors. From the 11th to the 13th century, Carcassonne was ruled by the Trencavel viscounts, who had feudal ties to both the counts of Toulouse and the kings of Aragon. In 1208 the Pope called for a crusade against southern nobles who tolerated the Cathar heresy on their lands. Carcassonne was besieged and surrendered. The viscounty became part of the royal domain, as did the greater part of Languedoc. The Inquisition was established to eradicate the remaining Cathars (or Albigenses). Carcassonne had both an Inquisition court and a prison where accused heretics were held, sometimes for years, in dark, cramped cells. Carcassonne took on a strategic role following the Treaty of Corbeil (1258) which established the border between France and Aragon 35 miles south of the town. Five mountain castles were rebuilt to serve as frontier fortresses. These so-called “Cathar castles” were originally built by southern nobles and sometimes served as a refuge for Cathars during the crusade. These border castles, as well as Carcassonne, lost their strategic value in 1659 when the Treaty of the Pyrenees moved the border with Spain to the Pyrenees. This richly-illustrated lecture will spotlight Carcassonne and two “Cathar” castles, Quéribus and Peyrepertuse.

CARCASSONNE AND THE CATHAR CASTLES

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Price: 35.00 USD
1 Weeks

11 - 06 - 2016, 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM 2016-11-06 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

Girded by a double ring of walls with 52 towers, Carcassonne is the finest surviving example of a medieval fortified town. Built first by Romans, then Visigoths, the fortifications were extended by the construction of the outer wall under King Louis IX and his successors. From the 11th to the 13th century, Carcassonne was ruled by the Trencavel viscounts, who had feudal ties to both the counts of Toulouse and the kings of Aragon. In 1208 the Pope called for a crusade against southern nobles who tolerated the Cathar heresy on their lands. Carcassonne was besieged and surrendered. The viscounty became part of the royal domain, as did the greater part of Languedoc. The Inquisition was established to eradicate the remaining Cathars (or Albigenses). Carcassonne had both an Inquisition court and a prison where accused heretics were held, sometimes for years, in dark, cramped cells. Carcassonne took on a strategic role following the Treaty of Corbeil (1258) which established the border between France and Aragon 35 miles south of the town. Five mountain castles were rebuilt to serve as frontier fortresses. These so-called “Cathar castles” were originally built by southern nobles and sometimes served as a refuge for Cathars during the crusade. These border castles, as well as Carcassonne, lost their strategic value in 1659 when the Treaty of the Pyrenees moved the border with Spain to the Pyrenees. This richly-illustrated lecture will spotlight Carcassonne and two “Cathar” castles, Quéribus and Peyrepertuse.

THE ARTS OF JAPAN - Adaption to Innovation

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Price: 35.00 USD
1 Weeks

11 - 13 - 2016, 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM 2016-11-13 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

Scholars of the arts and culture of Japan readily admit that the Japanese borrowed ideas in art, culture, and religion from mainland Asia. Anyone who looks at art from the Japanese islands at various time periods may recognize parallels with Chinese and Korean tradition. But periods of isolation, as well as access to different kinds of media, allowed Japanese artists to expand well beyond the initial borrowings. They created a unique culture, permeated with original concepts. We will explore the foundations of Japanese culture and art, then look at ways that the original concepts served only as the genesis of what followed.

THE ARTS OF JAPAN - Adaption to Innovation

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Price: 35.00 USD
0 Weeks

11 - 13 - 2016, 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM 2016-11-13 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

Scholars of the arts and culture of Japan readily admit that the Japanese borrowed ideas in art, culture, and religion from mainland Asia. Anyone who looks at art from the Japanese islands at various time periods may recognize parallels with Chinese and Korean tradition. But periods of isolation, as well as access to different kinds of media, allowed Japanese artists to expand well beyond the initial borrowings. They created a unique culture, permeated with original concepts. We will explore the foundations of Japanese culture and art, then look at ways that the original concepts served only as the genesis of what followed.

TRAVELS WITH BARRY - Shropshire—England’s Quiet County

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Price: 35.00 USD
0 Weeks

11 - 20 - 2016, 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM 2016-11-20 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

Tucked away up against the Welsh border with its “Blue Painted Hills” and “Green Golden Valleys”, Shropshire is England’s forgotten county--peaceful, idyllic land, far away in spirit from the large cities and roaring motorways of the English Midlands, just over its Eastern border. As A.E. Housman wrote in A Shropshire Lad: “Clunton, Clunbury Clungerford & Clun Are the quietest places Under the sun.” But the peaceful countryside today hides a turbulent past; a past of marcher lords, Mad Jack Mytton, and dramatic castles; one it is said, “so beautiful that when attacked, no one could bring themselves to destroy it.” As the novelist Mary Weber wrote of this tortured past and peaceful present: “Where triumph rang and men marched by, none passes but a dragonfly” Shropshire today is a land of beautiful scenery, charming towns such as Shrewsbury, Much Wenlock and Ludlow—“the gastronomic capital of the West of England”. Wroxeter was the largest Roman city in Britain, Ironbridge the birthplace of the Industrial Revolution, and the county is the setting for a plethora of virtually unknown country houses which rival those anywhere in England. Come and explore this wonderful unknown land, as P.G. Wodehouse noted: “the nearest earthly place to Paradise.”

TRAVELS WITH BARRY - Shropshire—England’s Quiet County

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Price: 35.00 USD
1 Weeks

11 - 20 - 2016, 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM 2016-11-20 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

Tucked away up against the Welsh border with its “Blue Painted Hills” and “Green Golden Valleys”, Shropshire is England’s forgotten county--peaceful, idyllic land, far away in spirit from the large cities and roaring motorways of the English Midlands, just over its Eastern border. As A.E. Housman wrote in A Shropshire Lad: “Clunton, Clunbury Clungerford & Clun Are the quietest places Under the sun.” But the peaceful countryside today hides a turbulent past; a past of marcher lords, Mad Jack Mytton, and dramatic castles; one it is said, “so beautiful that when attacked, no one could bring themselves to destroy it.” As the novelist Mary Weber wrote of this tortured past and peaceful present: “Where triumph rang and men marched by, none passes but a dragonfly” Shropshire today is a land of beautiful scenery, charming towns such as Shrewsbury, Much Wenlock and Ludlow—“the gastronomic capital of the West of England”. Wroxeter was the largest Roman city in Britain, Ironbridge the birthplace of the Industrial Revolution, and the county is the setting for a plethora of virtually unknown country houses which rival those anywhere in England. Come and explore this wonderful unknown land, as P.G. Wodehouse noted: “the nearest earthly place to Paradise.”

COLOR ME BEAUTIFUL -From Drab to Fab – The Transforming Power of Color

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Price: 35.00 USD
0 Weeks

02 - 19 - 2017, 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM 2017-02-19 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

Are your rooms looking a little tired and drab? Then why not liven them up with color! Nothing changes a room more than an infusion of color. Unfortunately, most people are afraid of using color because they don’t know how to choose the right color, let alone how to use it effectively. The same thing goes for pattern. The good news is there are some simple guidelines that professional designers use for creating beautiful color schemes which you will learn in this color lecture. With knowledge and skill, color has the power to transform a room like nothing else. It can make a room feel tranquil and serene or active and vibrant. Traditional design relies heavily on certain color combinations, variations, and patterns in order to create an elegant, timeless look while contemporary design requires a more structured color approach in order to be effective. Come learn the secrets to utilizing color effectively and then unleash the transforming power of color in your own home. You will be able to take your rooms from drab to fab in no time.

PARADISE IN THE ATLANTIC - Madeira and the Azores Islands

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Price: 35.00 USD
0 Weeks

03 - 12 - 2017, 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM 2017-03-12 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

The Portuguese islands of Madeira and the Azores have been called the “best-kept secrets in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean,” an “unspoiled paradise,” and “Europe’s answer to Hawaii.” Located more than 800 miles west of the European mainland, these volcanic islands were first discovered, and then settled, by Portuguese explorers in the 14th and 15th centuries (years before Columbus sailed for America). Protected by their isolation, the nine islands of the Azores retain much of their rugged and pristine beauty—the exposed tops of vast undersea mountains, located at the nexus of three tectonic plates—a world of smoking fumaroles and bubbling mud pots surrounded by blue lakes and green pastures—a UNESCO “beauty on earth.” Closer to the continental land masses, Madeira, and its capital of Funchal, was “discovered” anew by 19th century tourists from Britain. A visitor in 1825 waxed lyrical: “I should think the situation of Madeira the most enviable in the whole earth. It ensures European comfort with almost every tropical luxury”; which included, of course, its cornucopia of fine food and its famous namesake wine—all in the midst of “an exuberant botanical garden.” Come experience these tropical “paradises” on a gloomy March Sunday in Houston.

IMAGES OF THE CHILD IN PAINTING

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Price: 35.00 USD
0 Weeks

03 - 19 - 2017, 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM 2017-03-19 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

Anne Higonnet, art historian and author of “Pictures of Innocence: The History and Crisis of Ideal Childhood,” notes that early artistic images of children were portrayed as certain types, especially the Holy Child, adding, “prior to the 18th century, the concept of the child was as a small person born in sin.” What happened in the 18th century was a radical revision of that view—in other words, the invention of childhood as we generally understand it today. For such Enlightenment thinkers as Rousseau, children were naturally innocent and corrupted by society, a tabula rasa, printed upon by empirical experience, sensory impressions rather than innate ideas. The evidence for this change is clearly seen in the visual arts in paintings by Gainsborough, Hopper, and many others, and reaching its peak in the poetry and illustrations by William Blake and Wordsworth’s great poem of 1807, “Intimations of Immorality from Recollections of Early Childhood,” expressing the idea that childhood is a magical condition from which, as adults we are expelled, as if from Eden. This romantic view is modified in the 19th century with the introduction of photography, bringing both a new realism and a new idealism, most clearly seen in the images by Lewis Carroll. In this lecture, we will begin with a few images from the Renaissance to paintings in the 20th century, with many rarely seen works.

THE Centennial of The Great Migration: How Six Million African Americans Transformed the US

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Price: 35.00 USD
0 Weeks

04 - 09 - 2017, 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM 2017-04-09 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

The Great Migration (1917-1970) of more than six million African Americans out of the South to other regions of the United States is one of the most important, courageous, underreported yet consequential movements in our nation’s history. In search of true freedom, equality, education, and opportunity, those brave migrants—fleeing systemic racism, abuse, oppression, enforced poverty, and violence—transformed American culture, society, demographics, and politics in a multitude of ways, both tangible and intangible, short-term and long-term. Although many Americans do not learn about the Great Migration in their history classes, its centennial reminds us of just how far-reaching and long lasting the Migration’s legacy truly is.

PARTON AND POLITICAL PUNDITS IN: The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas

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Price: 35.00 USD
0 Weeks

05 - 14 - 2017, 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM 2017-05-14 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

Back by popular demand, "The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas" will be making a triumphant return to the WIH classroom. This lecture will focus on the political and social history of the film, while encouraging reading the film through a political lens. In the current political upheaval, rampant accusations of corruption, and conflated sexual affairs mixed with political scandal, "The Best Little Whorehouse" offers a regional take on the political system. We will explore the history of the Chicken Ranch and its complicated relationship with Texas politics, the history of the famous Parton film and stage productions, and the regional flavor of a certain brand of political corruption (it’s BBQ flavored in case you didn’t know). Come prepared to laugh, dance, and squirm in your seats at the uncomfortable intersection of scandal and sex in "The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas." As Dolly Parton might say, “Ya’ll (will wanna) come back now, ya hear?”

SHATTERING THE GLASS CEILING FOR OPTIMAL HEALTH & WELL-BEING

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Price: 35.00 USD
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09 - 17 - 2017, 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM 2017-09-17 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

As we age, we can easily imagine a better quality of life but we can also feel as if we are bumping up against something that makes it harder than ever to get there. In the past thirty years, there has been a dramatic spike in lifestyle-related diseases that are alarming in scope and staggering in cost. Many people, even some scientists and health researchers, remain deeply skeptical that we’ll find a solution to the problems of chronic diseases like diabetes, cardiovascular conditions, some cancers, and cognitive decline. This is because they have been looking in the wrong places, and may not appreciate that historically, science often leads to unexpected breakthroughs that can radically change everything. People talk about how they are stuck with slow metabolism, bad genes, and that it is too late to change for the better. However, in many ways, our future health and well-being probably depends much more on what we do in the next year than in the past. For example, current research shows anyone (regardless of weight and age) can significantly accelerate fat and glucose metabolism with low effort. Even the activity of key genes for healthy aging can be switched on after living a sedentary life. What if we could work together to find and deliver real-world solutions, which would improve our quality of life and help those we love? Our research team at the new center at the University of Houston is more optimistic than ever solutions are close at hand. Learn about the latest research and breakthrough discoveries and what they can mean for your health. Learn some important ways you can participate in the pioneering changes in Houston and beyond, so that together we can shatter the presumptive barriers preventing us from achieving better health.

Warsaw & Krakow: A Tale of Two Polish Cities

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Price: 35.00 USD
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09 - 24 - 2017, 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM 2017-09-24 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

Krakow and Warsaw are not as high on the Eastern European visitor list as their neighbors, Prague and Budapest. Yet both cities have myriad historic and scenic attractions that make a visit well worthwhile and surprisingly enjoyable as well. Krakow, mostly spared damage in World War II, is the best known to visitors today, with its vibrant Old Town and scenic Wawel Castle overlooking the Vistula River. But Warsaw, virtually destroyed in the war, is a surprisingly interesting and attractive city, full of ancient churches and important museums, and the story (and success) of the rebuilding of the city is part of the appeal in itself, an undertaking on a scale unprecedented in the whole of Europe. Practical advice on visiting both cities will be part of this Sunday talk.

RUSSIAN BECOMES EXOTIC

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Price: 35.00 USD
0 Weeks

10 - 22 - 2017, 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM 2017-10-22 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

Chaikovsky’s ballet, "The Sleeping Beauty", was a not so subtle tribute to the Russian court by comparing it to Louis XIV’s Versailles. Twenty years later, when Sergei Diaghilev brought Russian ballet to Paris, the productions that he intended as tributes to French ballet were overshadowed by the Parisians’ fascination with Russian exoticism, such as that found in "The Firebird".

THE SEPHARDIC (Spanish) JEWS: From Spain to the Ottoman Empire

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Price: 35.00 USD
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10 - 29 - 2017, 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM 2017-10-29 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

The legendary settlement of the Jews in Spain after the destruction of the Second Temple of Jerusalem in the year 70 C.E. is the point of departure for a socio-cultural account of their life in the Iberian Peninsula. Sephardic [Spanish] Jews under Islamic and Christian Spain emerge as an influential force in the economic, political, and intellectual life of the Peninsula. Following their Expulsion from Spain in 1492, most of the Sephardic Jews begin what they view as their own exile to the Ottoman Empire, where they remain for almost five centuries. Their profound identification with their Spanish origin and experiences shape their significant contributions to the new Ottoman environment. At the same time, their attachment to the Spanish language leads to the preservation of their linguistic heritage as a true “museum” of the language, known as Judeo-Spanish or Ladino, and it is still spoken today.

REIMS, VILLE DU SACRE: Coronation City

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Price: 35.00 USD
0 Weeks

11 - 05 - 2017, 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM 2017-11-05 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

For over a thousand years, French kings were crowned and anointed in Reims cathedral. In 816 Louis the Pious, Charlemagne’s son, chose the cathedral as a place of coronation in memory of the baptism in 498 A.D. of the Frankish king, Clovis, by the bishop of Reims. It took another couple of hundred years for the custom of coronations in Reims to be established. From 1027 on, all French kings were crowned at Reims, except for Louis VI and Henry IV. According to legend, at the baptism of Clovis a dove brought a glass vial containing holy oil from heaven, symbolizing the bond between royalty and the divine. The myth of the anointing of Clovis with oil sent from heaven established Reims as the place where the sacredness of monarchy was periodically renewed. This richly illustrated lecture will spotlight the cathedral, the archbishop’s palace, and the abbey church of Saint-Rémi, all on UNESCO’S World Heritage list. The lecture will also feature an extraordinary underground facet of the city’s heritage—former Gallo-Roman chalk quarries used by Champagne houses to store and mature the wine of kings.

APPLE ESSENTIALS: Everything You Need to Know About iPhones

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Price: 35.00 USD
0 Weeks

02 - 04 - 2018, 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM 2018-02-04 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

When is the best time to invest in a new iPhone/iPad? What are the important factors to know when choosing between the new iPhones and iPads? Is it worth upgrading to the new iOS 11 operating system? What are the features in iOS 11 that are valuable in my daily life? What settings need to be turned off? How can I stop the constant battery drain? In this first Sunday lecture of 2018, our tech guru, Liz Weiman will answer these questions and more! Just knowing this crucial information will decrease "tech stress", save you time and money, and arm you with the knowledge and confidence to choose and use your devices.

A CONVERSATION WITH KATE AND DAVID: The Connection Between Shakespeare and Art

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Price: 35.00 USD
0 Weeks

02 - 11 - 2018, 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM 2018-02-11 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

What is the connection between Shakespeare and art? In other words, how did David the artist get into Shakespeare and how did Kate the actress get into art? In this provocative lecture, David E. Brauer will discuss the many visual artist who have drawn inspiration from Shakespeare's plays. Kate Emery Pogue will discuss references to artists in Shakespeare's plays and will illustrate this with film clips from "Henry V", "A Midsummer Night's Dream", and "The Winter's Tale." This stimulating conversation will culminate in a Q&A with these two iconic professors.

THE RELEVANCE OF C.S. LEWIS TODAY

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Price: 35.00 USD
0 Weeks

02 - 18 - 2018, 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM 2018-02-18 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

C.S. Lewis is one of the greatest writers and thinkers of the twentieth century. In this lecture, Dr. Markos will consider the enduring legacy of C. S. Lewis, assess why he has had such a profound impact on twentieth-century readers, examine his remarkable range as an author, and survey the key events and people who helped shape his life, thought, and work. This is an important lecture as C.S. Lewis’ writings remarkably resonate in today’s uncertain world.

FLOOD RESILIENCE IN HOUSTON

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Price: 35.00 USD
0 Weeks

03 - 04 - 2018, 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM 2018-03-04 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

According to environmental attorney and professor, Jim Blackburn, “It is doubtful that any city in the United States, or the world, could have handled 40 inches of rain in 3.5 days or even 16 inches in 24 hours. However, the extent of damages and misery can be substantially reduced the next time. The task for Houston going forward is to adopt a series of policies and actions that can and will make a difference. Albert Einstein said, ‘We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them.’ This is Houston’s challenge—to think boldly and creatively to develop ideas and policies that are, indeed, different.” You will not want to miss this important lecture as it impacts all Houstonians!

PUEBLA, MEXICO: The New "Hot" Destination

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Price: 35.00 USD
0 Weeks

03 - 11 - 2018, 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM 2018-03-11 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

Last Fall, the Wall Street Journal named Puebla, Mexico as its #2 in its listing of top destinations for travel in 2018, this in spite of considerable damage by a violent earthquake in September. Just a two and a half hour car drive from Mexico City (and less than a two hour flight from Houston) Puebla is one Mexico's most historic cities, as well as being one of its most visually beautiful. It is the home of the gastronomic delight mole, talavara pottery, and Cinco de Mayo. Colonial churches abound, including an imposing cathedral adjacent to one of the most vibrant and beautiful central squares in the Americas. There are dozens of museums, including the amazing Museum of the International Baroque which opened last year and was designed by the Pritzker prize-winning architect, Toyo Ito. The huge and fascinating modern structure reflects the vibrant baroque style of the colonial city itself and has been called "the most important new art museum in North America." As if this were all not enough, Puebla is home to a new hotel that provides an extraordinary welcome to this jewel of a city. Travel with Barry to the virtually undiscovered PUEBLA, MEXICO!

MIND THE GAP: How the Jewish Writings between the Old and New Testament Help us Understand Jesus

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Price: 35.00 USD
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03 - 18 - 2018, 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM 2018-03-18 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

To understand Jesus of Nazareth, his apostles, and the rise of early Christianity, reading the Old Testament is not enough. In his new book, Mind the Gap, Rice religion scholar Matthias Henze argues that to understand the Jewish world from which Jesus emerged, we need to read ancient Jewish texts outside the Bible. These texts such as different Old Testaments, the Apocrypha and the Dead Sea Scrolls help explore the four-century gap between the Old and New Testaments and shed light on what the Jews of the Second Temple period and Jesus and his followers might have read. The New Testament assumes that we are familiar with Jewish beliefs and practices of the first-century Israel, when, in fact, most of us are not. But if Jesus was a practicing Jew, and if we know little about his Judaism, how can we understand Jesus, his life and message? This lecture and Matthias Henze’s book broadens the understanding of early Judaism and early Christianity.

FROM A BOX IN THE ATTIC: Posthumous Conversations Between a Doctor and a Rabbi

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Price: 35.00 USD
0 Weeks

05 - 06 - 2018, 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM 2018-05-06 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

"Learned by Heart: Dialogues with My Father", a new book written by Dr. Milton Klein, began as a dutiful compilation of the views of his father, Rabbi Dr. Carl Klein, about Judaism, philosophy, and Torah study and quickly morphed into a posthumous exchange about life, love, family, and core beliefs. Part medicine, part philosophy, part parenting guide, the book uncovers the quieter legacy and profound solace that stimulate explorations of remembrance and reflection. Dr. Klein will discuss several chapters that provide a fascinating interplay between medicine and Talmudic wisdom offering insights into how we deal with modern dilemmas, including the intense emotional challenges of health, life, death, and many other central themes that touch us all.

FALL FASHION TRENDS

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Price: 35.00 USD
0 Weeks

09 - 16 - 2018, 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM 2018-09-16 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

What are the trends for the Fall? And, how can you wear them? Join our fashion guru as she unpacks the season’s hottest fashion trends for the Fall and demonstrates how to make something go from the pages of a magazine to a realistic and exciting part of your wardrobe.

J.R.R. TOLKIEN: The Man Who Made Middle-Earth

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Price: 35.00 USD
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09 - 16 - 2018, 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM 2018-09-16 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

This lecture will survey the milestones in the life of J.R.R. Tolkien that led him to become the author of The Lord of the Rings. It will also discuss his pivotal friendship with C. S. Lewis and how the two mythmakers co-founded the Inklings. Come learn about Tolkien’s amazing journey to Middle-earth, a journey that included tragedy and triumph, sorrow, and joy.

STEPHEN F. AUSTIN, A BILINGUAL FORERUNNER: A Renaissance Man’s Vision for His Colony

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Price: 35.00 USD
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10 - 07 - 2018, 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM 2018-10-07 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

Historical figures such as Stephen F. Austin bring forth wonder, respect, skepticism, and hope. In the 1820's, when he led the first Anglo-American colonists into Mexico, a newly formed nation that had spent 300 years as part of the Spanish Empire, Austin did not know Spanish and his French was basic. From the start, he understood that to succeed in this new enterprise, he had to ensure that he and his colonists could communicate, both legally and socially, in the Spanish language of their newly adopted country. In this lecture, we will look at both the historical context of these times and Austin’s Spanish language skills, through his secret diary, and personal and business correspondence.

A CONVERSATION WITH KATE AND DAVID: Artists on Art

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Price: 35.00 USD
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10 - 14 - 2018, 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM 2018-10-14 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

David Brauer is a trained artist as well as an art historian. Kate Pogue is a stage director and playwright as well as a Shakespeare scholar. Together in this spirited exchange they will explore the many steps an artist takes to mastermind an idea from inspiration through to the finished work.

MISS IMA HOGG: The Great Texan and Collector

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Price: 35.00 USD
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10 - 21 - 2018, 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM 2018-10-21 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

Ima Hogg (1882-1975), philanthropist and patron of the arts, daughter of Sarah Ann (Stinson) and Governor James Stephen Hogg, was born in Mineola, Texas. She ranks among the best-known and most admired philanthropists in the history of Texas. For much of her life, she was affectionately known as the “First Lady of Texas,” owing to her family’s long tradition of public service. She transformed her home into a museum to display one of the best collections of American antiques. When oil was discovered on the family property, the new found wealth was used for public good. The Hoggs believed that since oil came from Texas land, it belonged to Texas citizens. This lecture will highlight Miss Hogg’s family, early life, and her parents’ influence on her and her brothers regarding public service. Bayou Bend, donated to the Houston Museum of Fine Arts by Miss Ima Hogg, was an extraordinary gift.

THE SEPHARDIC (SPANISH) JEWS: From the Ottoman Empire to America

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Price: 35.00 USD
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10 - 28 - 2018, 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM 2018-10-28 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

Following their expulsion from Spain in 1492, the Sephardic [Spanish] Jews were welcomed into the Ottoman Empire, where they spent over four centuries and contributed to its ascent. The beginning of the 20th Century reveals a two hundred year imperial decline in the making and the ensuing unfavorable environment prompts the Sephardic Jews to immigrate to America in search of a better future. Their integration into their new communities posed fresh challenges and unexpected consequences.

ANTIQUE APPRAISAL SUNDAY

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Price: 35.00 USD
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11 - 04 - 2018, 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM 2018-11-04 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

Join our in-house antiques guru Barry Greenlaw (who is also a genuine “antique” himself) for this exciting Sunday afternoon event. Bring up to three small items, or photos of large pieces, and Barry will attempt to identify them and provide an oral evaluation—no jewelry, rugs, clothing or anything else he knows nothing about. Join us for a fun, and hopefully educational, afternoon. “Vintage” wine and “aged” cheese will be served.

THE ROYAL ABBEY OF SAINT-DENIS: Cradle of Gothic Architecture

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Price: 35.00 USD
0 Weeks

11 - 11 - 2018, 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM 2018-11-11 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

According to legend, Denis, the first bishop of Paris, was decapitated by Romans on a hill overlooking Paris, known afterward as Montmartre. He picked up his head and walked to the site of the abbey, where he collapsed and was buried. In the 5th century a church was built over Denis’ grave, which had begun to attract many pilgrims. From the 7th century onward, a monastery existed, lavishly patronized by King Dagobert, considered to be the first king buried at St-Denis. With few exceptions, all kings were buried there from Hugues Capet onwards. Today, the cathedral houses a collection of over 70 recumbent statues and tombs, unique in Europe. Rebuilt and enlarged four times through the centuries, the abbey church became one of the first manifestations of Gothic architecture. This richly-illustrated lecture will cover the history of the abbey, its place in the development of Gothic architecture and sculpture, and its role as royal necropolis.