Sunday Lectures

JERUSALEM: Holy City in Time and Imagination

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Price: 35.00 USD
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04 - 28 - 2019, 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM 2019-04-28 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

Jerusalem, a city that is holy to Jews, Christians and Muslims, continues to be at the center of our religious imagination. It is also the source of much strife and contention. Using a few specific sites in Jerusalem as examples, Dr. Henze will look at the significance of Jerusalem in antiquity and discuss the role the same sites play today in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

THE SEPHARDIC [SPANISH] JEWS: Cultural Impact and Contributions

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Price: 35.00 USD
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05 - 05 - 2019, 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM 2019-05-05 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

The Sephardic [Spanish] Jews spent one thousand years in Spain before their Expulsion in 1492. Luminaries such as Judah Halevi, Maimonides, and Rabi Sem Tob de Carrión belong in both the Jewish world and in the Arts and Letters of Spain. Most of the Sephardic Jews settled in the Ottoman Empire, where they introduced the printing press in 1493. In 1563 Josef Caro published the Schulchan Aruch, a fundamental compendium of Jewish law. During the ensuing centuries they produced Biblical translations, commentaries, and secular writing, while preserving their language in proverbs, ballads, and other poetic forms. In this lecture, we will examine the cultural impact of their contributions over almost five hundred years.

THE TITANTIC: History’s Lessons on the Paradox of Disaster

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Price: 35.00 USD
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05 - 12 - 2019, 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM 2019-05-12 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

The sinking of the Titanic – probably the most famous ship of all time – in 1912 continues to attract incredible interest. Though the Titanic sank on its maiden voyage – indeed the term “Titanic” is synonymous with disaster – plans are underway for a launching of an exact replica, and recently a group of hedge funds paid $19.5 million for relics rescued from the doomed liner. The Titanic also inspired one of the top grossing motion pictures of all time. At 52,000 tons, it was considered the best ship ever built, but it sank because it ran into an iceberg. Passengers included members of some of the wealthiest families ever, the new industrial capitalists, as well as hundreds of lesser-known individuals, especially immigrants. Whether rich or poor, many perished in a debacle in which almost everything went wrong. Join Dr. Wil McCorquodale in an afternoon lecture to explore this disaster and its paradoxes.